Wednesday, July 9, 2014

Military Air Transport Service

Military Air Transport Service (MATS)


From: Encyclopedia of American Military History.

The Military Air Transport Service came into being in June 1948 through a merger of the Air Transport Command (ATC) and the Naval Air Transport Service. These military airlifters are charged with the transportation of almost anything anywhere at any time and in all kinds of weather. MATS has played an important role in both war and peace, despite substantial cutbacks in peacetime.

The first challenge MATS faced came with the Berlin blockade of 1948–49 and the need to supply the western zones of the city by air. MATS met the challenge, learning important lessons in the experience, including the fact that fewer large transports were more effective than more numerous smaller ones. MATS had originally been flying Douglas C-47 and Douglas C-54 Skymaster aircraft.

The next major challenge for MATS came in 1950 with the Korean War. Major General William H. Tunner, who had directed the Berlin Airlift, organized the Combat Cargo Command for the Far East Air Force, which was responsible for Korea. MATS even provided direct military support. During two days in November 1950 it dropped 140 tons of ammunition to marines engaged in desperate fighting at the Changjin/Chosin Reservoir. During the marines' withdrawal, Combat Cargo Command brought in 273 tons of supplies and evacuated 4,600 wounded. MATS grew substantially in size, and during the entirety of the war it transported 391,763 tons of cargo, 2.6 million passengers, and 310,000 medevac patients. The new Douglas C-124 Globemaster aircraft played a key role.

Following the war, budget cutbacks threatened to do away with MATS all together, and some in Congress wanted civilian airlines to transport passengers and goods. However, the 1960 crisis in the Formosa (Taiwan) Straits showed this to be impractical, and the idea was dropped. In February 1960 Secretary of Defense Neil McElroy created a military airlift policy, giving MATS responsibility for the nation's air transport in times of peace and war. This remained in effect until President Ronald Reagan's national airlift policy of June 1987.

The expansion of MATS coincided with President John F. Kennedy's policy of flexible response, which sought highly mobile conventional forces able to move at a moment's notice. New aircraft included the C-130 Hercules and the Boeing C-135. The Lockheed C-141 StarLifter began development. By the time America entered theVietnam War, the C-130 was the standard MATS workhorse. Suited for a variety of missions, it lifted personnel and cargo, and also served as a gunship, tanker, and medevac aircraft. It continues in use today as the C-130J. General Howell M. Estes, Jr., commander of MATS from 1964 to 1969, developed rapid turn-around procedures known as "quick stop" and "quick change." Howell also established a command post that connected MATS headquarters to the lowest field commanders to monitor airlift operations.

In January 1966 MATS was redesignated the Military Airlift Command (MAC). By 1967 and the height of the Vietnam War, MAC was moving 65,350 passengers and 42,296 tons of cargo per month in South Vietnam. MAC was also involved in combat operations. Operation Blue Light involved landing 2,952 troops and 4,749 tons of equipment of the 3d Infantry Brigade of the 25th Infantry Division from Hawaii directly to Pleiku, South Vietnam. During the 1968 Tet Offensive, MAC rendered particularly important service, transporting additional resources to South Vietnam. Concurrently, in Operation Combat Fox, MAC transferred troops to South Korea from the United States, Japan, and Southeast Asia as a consequence of the Pueblo incident. Other notable operations included delivery of supplies during the 1967 siege of Khe Sanh, the airlift of supplies to South Vietnamese forces during the 1972 Easter offensive, and the evacuation of U.S. personnel after the 1973 Paris cease-fire. MAC also carried out Operation Homecoming, the repatriation of U.S. POWs. In Operation Frequent Wind, MAC evacuated American and foreign nationals when the Republic of Vietnam collapsed in April 1975.

Today MAC continues its mission of serving as the U.S. military's air transport service. Recent successful operations include Operation Desert Shield, the military buildup before the 1991 Gulf War, and operations in Bosnia in 1996.

http://www.fofweb.com/History/hist_images/headers/further_info_header_wide.gif
Boyne, Walter J. Beyond the Wild Blue: A History of the United States Air Force, 1947–1997. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1997
Clayton, Knight. Lifeline in the Sky: The Story of the United States Military Air Transport Service. New York: William Morrow, 1957
Ulanoff, Stanley M. MATS: The Story of the Military Air Transport Service. New York: F. Watts, 1964
Williams, Nicholas M. Aircraft of the United States Military Air Transport Service, 1948 to 1966. Leicester, U.K.: Midland, 1999.
http://www.fofweb.com/History/hist_images/headers/citation_info_header_wide.gif
Text Citation (Chicago Manual of Style format):
Halin, Jason M. "Military Air Transport Service (MATS)." In Tucker, Spencer C., gen. ed. Encyclopedia of American Military History. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2003. American History Online. Facts On File, Inc. http://www.fofweb.com/activelink2.asp?
ItemID=WE52&iPin=EMHII0274&SingleRecord=True (accessed July 9, 2014).

MATS


The Military Air Transport Service was activated 1 June 1948. It was created by consolidating the Air Transport Command and the Naval Air Transport Service under the control of the newly created United States Air Force (USAF). The first test of the newly created MATS was the Berlin Airlift--"OPERATION VITTLES". The Soviets had blocked all surface transportation in the western part of Berlin. Railroads tracks were destroyed, barges were stopped on the rivers, and highways and roads blocked. The only avenue left was through the air. On June 26, 1948, the airlift began. MATS transports from around the globe began making their way to Germany, including 2 of the U.S. Navy's air transport squadrons assigned to MATS. This operation would continue for some 15 months until the Soviets lifted the blockade. MATS would provide numerous humanitarian airlifts of global proportions.

Within MATS there were other technical services such as Air Weather Service (AWS), Air Rescue Service (ARS), Special Airlift Mission (SAM), Air Photographic and Charting Service (APCS), and the Aeromedical Transport Wing (AMTW). The U.S. Navy was an integral part of MATS, providing 5 transport squadrons to the joint service effort.

In the early days of MATS, there were 3 divisions, Atlantic, Pacific, and Continental. A later reoganization called for just 2 divisions -- Eastern Transport Air Force (EASTAF) and the Western Transport Air Force (WESTAF). To accomplish the global mission required, MATS has used many different aircraft. The C-47 "Gooney Bird", C-46 Curtis Commado, C-135 Stratolifter, C-141 Starlifter, C-130 Hercules, C-133 Cargomaster, C-124 Globemaster, C-118 Liftmaster, C-121 Super Constellation, C-74 Globemaster I, C-97 Stratofreighter, and the C-131 Samaritan just to name a few. Each of the individual technical MATS services had their own specific aircraft to carry out their mission.

On January 1, 1966 MATS was deactivated and the Military Airlift Command was created to continue the traditions MATS had began.

source: some infomation adapted from the book, "MATS: The Story of the Military Air Transport Service." by Stanley M. Ulanoff.
1964: The Moffa Press, Inc.


The History of the Military Air Transportation Service

military

The Military Air Transportation Service, commonly referred to as MATS, is an inactive Department of Defense Unified Command. Although it is no longer active, the Military Air Transportation Service played a crucial role in the Korean War, the Cuban Missile Crisis and the Vietnam War. Upon its disestablishment, the Air Force components were reassigned to the Military Airlift Command, and the Navy components were reassigned to the U.S. Navy.

Why Was the Military Air Transportation Service Created?

During World War II, the United States Army Air Forces Air Transport Command was used to meet the urgent demand for reinforcements at U.S. military bases across the globe. An air supply system was utilized instead of traditional, land based transportation. The end of World War II brought the end to this command, however, as it was deemed to be only a necessity during a time of war.

When the United States Air Force was separated from the army and became its own entity in 1947, the Air Transport Command was scrapped. However, the newly created Department of Defense believed that the Air Force needed this troop deployment method, and the Military Air Transportation Service was born.
How Was the Military Air Transportation Service Different From the Air Transport Command?
Although not formally listed as a military mission, the Military Air Transportation Service was controlled primarily by the U.S. Air Force. To further the mission and directive of the Military Air Transportation Service, the Naval Air Transport Service was consolidated into this service as well. This consolidation put the sanctioning power of the Military Air Transportation Service in the hands of the Department of Defense, instead of the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Air Force sanctioning two identical services separately.
What Roles Did the Military Air Transportation Service Play in Conflicts?

During the Korean War, the Military Air Transportation Service played a vital role in offering support to the United Nations troops. They operated from the United States to Japan, supplying routes into Japan and providing troop carrier services throughout the war.

With the Cuban Missile Crisis in full swing, the Military Air Transportation Service air lifted thousands of troops for rapid deployment. Additionally, they transported thousands of tons of military gear and other necessities from around the United States to Florida and Guantanamo Bay.

The Vietnam War was also heavily aided by the Military Air Transportation Service. Not only did they provide needed supplies and equipment for the war, but they also helped more than 14,000 troops receive proper medical attention and treatment by transporting them to medical facilities.

Why Did the Military Air Transportation Service Cease Operations?

In 1965, the U.S. Navy withdrew its components to reallocate its resources to different programs. This led to the Military Airlift Command being activated, which took over all responsibilities of the once commissioned Military Air Transportation Service. The method of deployment and functionality of the program stayed the same, but fell under specific U.S. Air Force command and assumed a new name.

Created as a result of consolidating two different programs, the Military Air Transportation Service played a crucial part in all military action taken by the United States from 1948 to 1966. Although the program has changed names and branch delegations a number of times, the basic functionality of air lifting troops and providing equipment and resources is still carried out by the U.S. military today.

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Psycho Assassins and Witnesses?

Are These People Crazy or What?

It didn’t take long for someone to claim that Lt. Commander Terri Pike is an unreliable source because she was a mental case – when in fact, the two JFK Assassination Records she calls our attention to – the ONI Defector File and Oswald’s 119 Reports, stand alone and do not change whether or not Terri Pike padded her expense account, traveled without authorization and was a total mental case.

I think a close look at the Terri Pike Affair clearly shows that the charges she was brought up on – unauthorized travel, was a trumped up charge and she was railroaded by the military brass who didn’t want her to complete the job she was tasked and dedicated to – locating the government records related to the Assassination of President Kennedy.

When given the chore – over a year after the head of ONI merely replied to the Assassination Records Review Board (ARRB) request for ONI documents related to the assassination, that they didn’t have any, Pike located significant clearly related records, some of which she said she found “by accident” because they were “misfiled.”

She was given very high marks by the Review Board staff for her work ethic and cooperation, and was made the task leader, along with a number of other US Navy Reserve (USNR) Lt. Commanders, neither of whom were charged or dissaplined for the same infractions, or psychologically evaluated and discharged.
Instead, the officer she traveled with – LTCM Doolittle, was brought into the regular Navy and given another assignment while the other LTCM B., a legal aide – ala – was described by ARRB staff as being a “pit bull” and uncooperative, signed off on the ONI statement that all relevant documents had been turned over to the ARRB for inclusion in the JFK Act, under penalty of perjury. He too should be called as a witness before the Congressional hearing on JFK Assassination Records, whenever they decide to exercise their oversight responsibilities.

 ARE ALL OF THESE PEOPLE CRAZY, OR WHAT?

In light of the false public allegations that LTCM Terri Pike - the ONI records officer assigned to identify JFK assassination records is a mental case – and therefore a bad source for the clearly relevant and now believed significant ONI Defector File and still missing 119 Reports, I think it worthwhile to revisit a number of other “mental cases” that could be significantly relevant –

1)      US Army General Edwin Walker, relieved of command after distributing right wing literature to his troops, psychologically evaluated at Springfield medical facility and released from the service. A doctor at Springfield (MO.) also prepared a report on mental patients there who threatened the president, a Warren Commission document.

2)      DINKIN, EUGENE. Official at U.S. mission, Berlin. Involved in Richard Case Nagell’s release from East Germany in 1968. Eugene B. Dinkin studied psychology at the University of Illinois and enlisted in US Army in 1961, trained at Fort Gordon, Georgia, and assigned to National Security Agency counterpart Army Security Agency (ASA) as a ‘crypto operator” with a crypto level clearance, one of the highest.  On September 24, 1963 Dinkin was given a psychiatric evaluation and transferred to other duties, his security clearance revoked after he gave a speech on stockpiling nuclear weapons during a troop information class on the subject of “Duty, Honor, Country.” Dinkin also said a few months before the assassination that “a conspiracy was in the making by the military of the United States, perhaps combined with an ultra-right economic group…”  On October 22, 1963 Dinkin wrote a letter to Attorney General Robert Kennedy warning about an assassination attempt on President Kennedy in November that would be blamed on Communists, a conspiracy engineered by elements of the military and a military coup might ensue. On October 25 Dinkin tried to contact ambassadors to Luxemborg, “in hopes that his message would filer through the intelligence networks back to the United States.” (ala Dick Russesll, TMWKTM, p. 554) On November 2, 1963 Dinkin got leave and then went AWOL, attempting to contact the editor of a Geneva publication. After the assassination (May 1964), Richard Helms of the CIA called attention to Dinkin, who was hospitalized at Landstuhl General Hospital psychiatric ward immediately after the assassination, when he was interviewed by the Secret Service. Dinkin was transferred to Walter Reed in December 1963. Dink said he was able to draw his conclusions about the Kennedy assassination from images in news photographs. I think the news photo Dinkin saw was one of the Venezuelan Arms Cache. Dinkins filed a lawsuit against the government in 1975, and may still be alive.

3)      G. Garrett Underhill, a high level think tank analyst for government and government defense contractors, Underhill warned friends of a secret government cabal that was going to take over the government, and committed suicide or was murdered, possibly because of his special knowledge acquired from sources inside the government or military.

4)      Richard Case Nagel – primary subject of Dick Russell’s The Man Who Knew Too Much, (TMWKTM) who walked into El Paso, Texas bank and fired a pistol into the air in order to get arrested by federal authorities and be in prison when the assassination occurred.

5)      Lee Harvey Oswald – accused assassin of President Kennedy, who had  no motive to kill him other than an operational one, but is still falsely branded a deranged loner and psychopath, who also took a shot a Gen. Walker (Case Study #1) and killed Dallas policeman J.D. Tippit for no apparent reasons, so he must have been crazy.

6)      George deMohrenschildt – best friend of Oswald (Case Study #5) who saw the rifle, joked about shooting Walker and received a Backyard Photo of Oswald holding rifle alleged to have killed JFK and pistol alleged to have killed Tippit, signed on the back “Hunter of Fascists, ha, ha.” DeMohrenschildt had contact with important CIA and military intelligence officers, was in Haiti at the time of the assassination, and wrote an important manuscript “I’m a Patsy!” before receiving electro shock treatments and allegedly committing suicide after being contacted by a House Select Committee on Assassinations (HSCA) investigator.

7)      Now LTCM Terri Pike is being classified a mental case unfit after classifying the ONI Defector File a JFK Assassination document and being asked to locate the still missing 119 Reports on the official military investigations of Oswald after his defection and the assassination. She certainly was crazy for thinking she should follow the law – and she wrote the law number - 44 U.S.C. 2107 on the side of the ONI Defector boxes – so it would be so classified, and not reclassified as “NBR” – Not Believed Relevant - as the ONI brass wants it. She was crazy for doing such a good job, and finding relevant records “by accident” that were misfiled and for taking on the task of locating the 119 Reports, which was her last assignment before being brought up on false charges of unauthorized travel.



Friday, June 13, 2014

USAF Col. Edward J. Walz

Ed Walz

Handprinted notes from unnamed ARRB staff member (either Doug Horne, Michelle Combs or Jim Goslee) on unlined white page – “Fred Reeves Interviewed on 9/16/97 GS-12 in 1959 12-15 “119” Reports seen in 1959-1960 on defector Oswald. Ed Waltz (underlined) – Friend of BOTH DEMOHRENSCHILDT & REEVES – was virulently anti-JFK. “Hated Him”. Business partner w/DEM.

Walz Also Told Reeves DEM. Was “sleeping w/ Marina”

Also photo copy of envelop with Walden Oil Company – Penhouse, Reserve Loan Life Bldg. Dallas, Texas and photocopy of blank sheet of white paper with same letterhead, with the addition of “Producers of Crude Oil.”

Knew DeMohrenschildts AND Fred Reeves – ONI NIS San Diego?

FROM OTHER SOURCES I determined that:

US Air Force Col. Edward J. Walz – of Philadelphia.

In April 195? DeMohrenschildet Married Dr. “De De” Wynne Sharples, of Philadelphia whose father a Colorado Oilman, and uncle Lt. Col. Edward J. Walz, somehow ? – known to US ONI NIS investigator Fred Reeves of San Diego. ?
With DeMohrenschildt formed the Waldon Oil Company
(Sic: Walden Oil Company – Penthouse, reserve Loan Life Buildg, Dallas 1, Texas

Listed as Air Force Col.  past (1945-1947) Commander 449 Expeditionary Flying Training Squadron,
McDill AFB Florida



Special Interest Report - ONI Investigator Fred Reeves

Special Interest This Inquiry – (p.2, 3, 4)
Apparently hand written by Fred Reeves (in 1997)
[BK: I will try to find p. 1 of this document – 102-526….]
                                                                                                                                                          2.
On ____________1959 call came from DNI requesting background information on Lee Harvey Oswald, Enlisted US Marine Corps [El Toro crossed out] MCAS, el Toro CA.
Checked with personnel officer El Toro.
Oswald Honorable discharged _______________________________-
Discharge based on family hardship signed by Oswalds Mother.
Oswald a fraudulent discharge since Oswald left the US and sought sanctuary and Russian citizenship in the Soviet union.
CIA took over investigation of Oswald in Soviet Union.
ONI from DIO // ND began background investigation of Oswald (as a Marine) in the US and Japan.
First lead sent to Washington (DNI) from DIO San Diego – leads from Washington distributed to responsible agents in // DD and Japan.
END PAGE 2
                                                                                                                                                          3
Investigative Reports were copied to DIO // ND and Main? File xxxx compiled and retained in Wash DC.
The Naval Investigative Service Maintained the Oswald file and packaged in accordance with the Freedom of Information Act a complete investigative package distributed to those requesting information under the Truth of Information Act [BK: Sic]
A package was obtained by this reporting agent thru NIS in approx 1964 Copies of most investigative reports were included in the package.
It was understood at the time that the US Marine Corps Headquarters also held files on Oswald. These files were not obtained by this reporting agent.
The Secret Service was also alleged to have a file on Oswald which was not obtained by this agent.
As a civilian this agent began a thorough investigation of the Kennedy Assassination. He has reviewed all available information in the National Archives, has talked several times with Oswald’s wife Marina. A tape
END p. 3
Of one or more of the conversations with Mrs. Oswald was made (possibly illegally) as I do not recall informing her that the conversation was being recorded.
As an issue beyond the Oswald investigation this agent has concluded that Oswald shot the President in accordance with the desire of the Mob boss Carlos Marcello, now deceased.
It is possible that Oswald killed a Marine guard in Japan in his efforts to learn more about the U2 spy plane.
As the world knows Oswald tried to kill General Ed. Walker and in addition to killing President Kennedy he killed officer JD Tippit.
The files presented by this Agent concern only Oswald. All other files are available in the National Archives.

END p. 4

ARRB Meeting Report w/ONI Investigator Reeves

MEETING REPORT

Document’s Author: Douglas Horne/ARRB Date Created: 09/16/97
Meeting Logistics
Date:   09/16/97
Agency Name:  Witness/Consultants
Attendees: Fred Reeves, Doug Horne, Michelle Combs, and Jim Goslee
Topic: ARRB Interviewed Fred Reeves-Corrected Version (9/17/97 

Summary of the Meeting

Fred Reeves (James F. Reeves, Jr.) came to Washington at our invitation to discuss his knowledge of a post-defection investigation of Oswald in 1959 (and early 1960). At the time he was a G-12, and was a Navy civilian Intelligence Operations Specialist in the 11th Naval District Intelligence Office in San Diego. He said he was the head of the office in San Diego. [The meeting was tape recorded, this is only a summary of highlights.]

Fred told us that about a week or so after Oswald had defected (he remembered it as August, 1959), he received a phone call from Washington, in which two people, a Navy Captain from Washington (Head of ONI?), and Rufus Taylor, who Reeves described as the incoming Director of Naval Intelligence, jointly called him and told him of the defection, and told him to conduct a background investigation. He said that he went to MCAS El Toro, copied Oswald’s service record, and mailed the service record and a list of several names of Marine Corps associates of Oswald to ONI in Washington. He said ONI in Washington ran the investigation and directed that various people in the field from ONI to conduct an investigation of Oswald. He explained that OPNAV forms 5520-152 (“152s”) were requests sent to the field from ONI to conduct investigations, and OPNAV forms 5520-119 (“119s”) were investigative reports sent back to ONI in Washington reporting on the results of interviews or investigations.

He said that although he did not interview anyone himself, he did see 12 to 15 “119” reports come across his desk regarding the Oswald investigation in late 1959 and early 1960 – he said he was “cut in” on these reports by ONI at his request. He said he was aware of “119” reports filed from Japan and Texas, also during this time period. He said the emphasis of the reports was to try to assess potential damage done to national security by Oswald’s defection.

Fred gave us the names of 3 former ONI/NIS officials, with whom he discussed the Oswald case in 1959 and 1960, to contact in the even we wanted to pursue further possible leads:

-CAPT Jack Johnson, USN (Ret.): “Head of NIS in 1960” – now in Florida, at (813) 859-4574;
- Sherman Bliss, SA in 1959: Now in San Diego, at (619) 451-1370
-Winston Kuehl, SA in 1959: Now in San Diego, at (619) 693-0945.

Fred brought numerous documents with him – we copied them all, and need to review them.
Upon initial examination, none of them appear to be “119” reports from 1959 or 1960 – the few Oswald “119s” are post-assassination. Most, or all, of the documents he provided appear to be open already – we will check first, before inquiring with ONI. Many of them appear to be redacted FOIA releases from 1975, 1977, etc.

He said he had seen 8-10 “119” reports after the assassination, as well. END



Notes on Oswald's Military Files

Historical Naval District Stuff – Handwritten notes –
9th Naval District

Historical 1959-1963 Only 1953
Naval Command District Commandant
Lipton - 67th X Chief Naval Operations
Maintain their facilities and yards & docs – CNO
The information on Naval Districts (433-2434) Navy Records Management Washington Navy Yard.
Forest Lakes – 312-353-3976 7358 South Palaski, Chicago 60629
Jim Jensen Records Gxg?
9 circled –
St. Louis
Regional (Chicago)
National Address Southwest Region 77
PO 62/6 Ft Worth Texas 76115 Fl. 817-334-5525
Southwest Region – Ft. Worth Texas – 8th Naval
15th 1942-56 Same 1917-1933
Sxxx
National Axxxxx Trust Fund Board
301-713-6405 Cxxxx, Establish the account north
Command
Chief of Naval Operations
Archives – Mil Ref Navy 501-5671 Mr. Van Donnoff
Naval Historical Society – 433-3171

END PAGE 1

NAVCISUPPCEN  Warrant Name – Naval Investigations Unit  (underlined) Director of Criminal Investigations Counter Intelligence
Navy Counter Intelligence Support Center
Fairmount Building
420 N. Fairfax Drive (Records)
Arlington, VA 22203
Had Oswald’s personnel file at one time
23 Nov 63
Records Management – arrow – 202-433-4505 M. O Conner/ Mrs. Neely Txxx? 433-9520 Navy Yard
ONI OP-921DHF (Code 26)
Interview w/Capt. Donovan, had access to call signs and codes which were compromised and changed at time of defection.
Source FBI Morusse? File Interview
Oswald/Donovan Both were attached to the Counter Air Operations Center (CAOC) with Marine Air Control Squadron 9 (MACS-9) US Marine Corps, Santa Ana Californa PA/Xtxxx? 714-726-2938 Mister Long? -3rd Marine Air Wing HW HQs Squadron – Oswald knew – displacement of most military squadrons of all services on the West Coat, numbers and type aircraft of all services on the West Coast – Ranges and locations of radar control sites of all services on the West Coast
XXXX?- 38
Camp Pendlleton MACO 38th 4322
726-6836/51 (714) 726-5368

END OF PAGE 2

Basic Training Unit
AIT Unit
ATSUGE, Japan
Santa Anna CA
Dept of State, Moscow
Alusna Moscow
Alusna Tokyo
ONI Op-92101
ONI New Orleans, LA
9th Naval District Illinois
8th Naval District N.O. LA
Commandant Marine Corps G-2 HQ
Commandant US Marine Air Corps Training Glanview, IL
USN CounterIntell Support Center (Case History)
Under Secretary of the Navy Paul B. fay
OP 923M5
Secretary of the Navy Nitze
General Tompkins Office
Assistant Director of Navy Intelligence J.O. Johnson, Captain, USNR
OP-921K
Department of the Navy Office of the Chief of Naval Operations OP921E
Army Chief of Staff for Intelligence
112th Intelligence Group
Judge Advocate Office

END PAGE 3

258 Transfer 16 Feb 94
X Ronald Swerczek chief projects 591 4131 (3995)
NSA Tordella, Louis Deputy Director
1958-1974
“Knows where the bodies are buried”
2 listening post Homestead Florida
Jery Burke – NSA 1976 – (Parvis) 8403 Calesville Road Silver Sprign
589-4949
Wednesday
Ask Marine history Q’s
Call Grafouski 433-3439
Marine xxxx records for Sayxxxx
(Knows NISC 5 Info)
Call Sandy Alport 433-9371 Neely has Oswald’s Record
Call Jim Mallet Southwest Region
817-334-5515
Knows 8th Naval District Records from 1960 thru late 60s
Ask about ONI, New Orleans Files
Call Tilley ask about NORDIS 5 Systems
Call Jim Jensen Navy org ONI New Orleans
Not much

END PAGE

3/15

Jim Mallet – Southwest Regional Office
Does not have records of significance on the 8th Naval District
He does have equipment used at the Parkland Hospital Trauma Unit utilized for Kennedy
They filmed the records of the Dallas Police Files

Jim Jensen – Policy Xxx for Retxxxxx

Director Naval History (Naval Historical)

Calverconi, Operatives 202 Kay E – 433-3224/3170

To Steve Tilley – Archives II
Spoke w/ Steve about the Naval Counter Intelligence Support Center I mentioned that the FOIA office had sent a copy of the Oswald file to its Archives I about a year ago. He did not know this. Surprised. I called the FOIA office to find out who at the Archives had signed the transmitted receipt at the Archives I office archives. Ron Swazel, chief project office.  Also discussed the Army Informant files. The Army did not use RIF or enter the data on the Diskettes. It could take months.
Bxxx Hxxx was read to him Fridayxxx he xxxx found this could delay for their delivering files.

END PAGE

3/15

The army has around 10,000 documents
12 FRC Boxes or 30 Grey Boxes
Names of Informants
No Disketts or RIF
Haggarts office forgot to do this
He tried to dump them on Tilley w/o filling out forms or entering them into a database.

Jim Mallet Southwest Regional Office has the Parkland Hospital Trama Unit in his vault. Equipment. Is it a record?
Has no files on or pertaining to pertenant information regarding the 8th Naval District.

Dept. of State 202-647-4000
Records 73382 –
433-3396 Amy Kaster

Headquarters

END PAGE

XXXXXXXxOAC S.I. Office
XXXX
3/17
Refernce Section
Terry Xx Goff knows Anna Nelson
U.S. Army History 5421
Ms. Denna gave the information
What is army project 2831 on OASCI

112 Southwest Region
4th Army at San Xx

CONARC
USAINTC
Counter Intelligence caps
4th Army G-2
Southern
OASCI – Special Group
902 MI Group Center Records #(301) 677?-6763
Intelligence Records Repository Ft. Meade Maryland
At Ft. Meade
Central Security Facility
(Combined) Freedom of Information Office (301) 677-4502
Xxxx Type Investigation Ird IRi – Has Original Documents
Defense Secure Nxxxxx  (301) 677-4502
Central Security          (902 MI Group)

END PAGE


Mar 20 Monday
XXx Call XXXX St.xxxx NPRC   Air Force History 202-767-5088 Public Affairs 202-767-4783
Personnel Div.
Mid XX XXxx 767-4622
Air Force Records Retired
John XXXX Edward Pic #11313239
MPS – Customer 767-4440  Fxxxx ixpct.
Retired Personal Records   Eric Bolly (314) 538-4084 St. Louis, MO
NPRC (MPR)
9700 Page Blvd.
St. Louis, MO 63132

Board of C…..
SAS/MIBR
SOC St. West
AWING Basement
Randolph 78150-4722

- Mayor Robert H. Erdrich 112th Intell Corps Group
Active

END PAGE

XXXXXXX XxxXXXXXX
Received information that Pic’s XX Air Force Personnel File is in the vault at the Reserve Center. All investigative paperwork was taken out. Probably w/AF Office of Investigation.
Retired from the Air Force 1986. Bolg has record.

Major Eridge records are in reserve officer section
SSN #088-18-9161
Office that has it – (314) 538-3701 X Public Affairs #3828.
Ft. Meade part of 902’s Records Facility for ACSI Files
Has files pertaining to action by the ACSI during the period. XX have 1350s.
(301) 677-6762
Naval Counter Intelligence Support Center
(Has Oswald’s File) Mrs. Neely 433-9520
Sandy Alpoit 433-9371
Jean Connover FOIA person sent 433-9289
Anna Nelson Brief on Records 3/20
Jerry Nathorn – The Classified Records
Mongoose File – Released  Bobby Kennedy Gen Lansdale
CIA – xxxxize – Oswald History
Walter Bedell Smith – Bio xxxx
Lansdale
Califano’s Papers




Donovan Oswald's USMC Officer

Op-921D4F/d;e
3 December 1963
FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY
MEMORANDUM FOR THE FILE

Subj: OSWALD, Lee Harvey, 1653230, ex-PFC, USMCR (Deceased)
1.      On 2 December 1963, Jerome VACEK, Headquarters, U.S. Marine Corps, (Telephone – Oxford 4-2475) advised that DONOVAN, John E., CAPT, USMCR (Inactive) may be able to furnish information re Subject during his (Subject’s) tour of duty in the Marine Corps. According to VACEK, OSWALD is alleged to have worked for DONOVAN for approximately nine (9) months. DONOVAN is (Crossed out) reported [handwritten underneath] to be in the Washington D.C. area.
2.      The District of Columbia telephone book lists DONOVAN as residing at 2009 Belmont Road, N.W., Washington, D.C., telephone number 332-7717.
3.      The Federal Bureau of Investigation and United States Secret Service were made cognizant of the foregoing on 2 December 1963.
Signed
R. V. SCHULTZ

ONI File Record
173-10011-10115 

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